The Forgotten Data Centers

Data centers are where the Internet and cloud services live, and so they have been getting lots of public attention in recent years. If we read technology news or research papers, it’s not uncommon that we see IT giants, like Google and Facebook, publicly discuss and share the designs of mega-scale data centers they operate. But, another important type of data center –– multi-tenant data center, or commonly called “colocation”/”colo” –– has been largely hidden from the public and rarely discussed (at least in research papers), although it’s very common in practice and located almost everywhere, from Silicon Valley to the gambling capital, Las Vegas.

Unlike a Google-type data center where the operator manages both IT equipment and the facility, multi-tenant data center is a shared facility where multiple tenants house their own servers in shared space and the data center operator is mainly responsible for facility support (like power, cooling, and space). Although the boundary is blurring, multi-tenant data centers can be generally classified as either a wholesale data center or a retail data center: wholesale data centers (like Digital Realty) primarily serve large tenants, each having a power demand of 500kW or more, while retail data centers (like Equinix) mostly target tenants with smaller demands.

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